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A Review on the Book “Club Expat: A Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas”

A Review on the Book “Club Expat: A Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas”

A Review on the Book “Club Expat: A Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas”

Let’s face it: not many people find travel books as fascinating reading. Although people do find other places interesting, there’s just not much that can be said for books which contain a thousand obscure facts about different countries crammed into a book. Although this might sound like fun for a trivia geek, it just sounds boring to other people. The book Club Expat: a Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas, however, shows that there still is hope for the travel book industry.

This book, authored by the brothers Aniket and Akash Shah, certainly has caught people by surprise. It is part biography, part travel guide and a whole great guide to life. What separates it from other books, however, is the prose. The authors wrote the book in a unique style that just promises to grab the readers and suck them into the world within the book. They let the readers experience a ride full of wonder, loops and leaps and dives.

Moving overseas will always be hard on a teenager. It would be like saying goodbye to a world which they have only begun to explore. It is often the case that a teenager will feel cheated as though you gave him or her some hope and then dashed it against the rocks of reality. In times like this, a teenager needs reassurance that everything will be okay. They need to know that their lives will not end simply because they are moving overseas. The book Club Expat: a Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas definitely does the job!

Club Expat: a Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas teaches teenagers how to embrace what life throws at them. It teaches them how to look at the move from another perspective. It teaches them to find the core of stability within the whirlwind caused by the decision to move.

The book Club Expat: a Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas is a must-read for any teenager moving overseas. The book will help them see the move as a new adventure. It will help them see the move as a fresh start in life. It will help them realize that it isn’t really as earth-shattering as they fear.

Most people found the books very helpful because of the various tips and bits of advice that can be found inside. These useful tidbits can help teenagers survive the little challenges of life as an expatriate.

At first, the book seems to be a simple guide for teens on how to survive moving overseas. However, reading it, people will realize that the ultimate lesson found in this gem is the lesson of life itself. There are certain events in our life that people cannot do anything about. We cannot change what happens in our lives. What we can change is the way we react to it.

The whole book Club Expat: a Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas is a heartwarming book filled with useful lessons regarding life and living. It tells us how you should recognize and embrace every opportunity life can give you. It shows how you should take a look at what life throws at you and recognize how you can use those projectiles for your growth.

Club Expat: a Teenager’s Guide to Moving Overseas is a great read, filled with lessons that can help you face life with confidence.

Our Ultimate Reality Review – Good Or Bad?

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Our Ultimate Reality Review – Good Or Bad?

After having a chance to read the ebook myself, I decided to write this Our Ultimate Reality review. Hopefully, after reading this short review you’ll have a good idea what the book is all about and if it is something that warrants your attention.

The subtitle of Adrian Cooper’s book, Our Ultimate Reality, is Life, the Universe and the Destiny of Mankind. It’s kind of heady subject matter, I must admit. While I’m a voracious reader, I sometimes struggle through such dense subjects and was initially concerned that the book wouldn’t be a pleasurable read. In fact, I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to get through it at all, much less actually comprehend what I was taking in. I was pleasantly surprised to find that not only is the book readable, but it’s actually enjoyable as well.

In fact, I couldn’t get enough of the topic. Fortunately, when you pick up the Our Ultimate Reality ebook, you also receive the popular newsletter free of charge. Read by hundreds of thousands of people, it’s got a ton of valuable information, news and guidance for your destiny and life as you travel on this giant rock we call earth.

If you aren’t willing to take my word for it, you can read seven full chapters of Our Ultimate Reality free of charge to try it out. Detailing such important subjects as out of body experiences, the Eternal Now, imagination, astral projection and more, you’ll find yourself turning to this book time and time again. You’ll gain the ability to heal any disease no matter how serious it may seem, to visit where you go after ìdeathî and visit ìdeadî people and to contact your inner-self in order to find the answers to important questions.

Of course, those are just a few of the things you’ll get out of Our Ultimate Reality, which is why I wholeheartedly recommend it. It’s something that we all can benefit from, and I urge you to at least pick up the free chapters to see how you like it.

Movie review: Perfect Holiday not so perfect

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Movie review: Perfect Holiday not so perfect

The Perfect Holiday is seasonably pablum partially redeemed by a smart (if wasted) cast and at least one unusual holiday bit. Directed by co-written by Lance (The Cookout) Rivera, the film mostly flounders through contrived meet-cute scenes and some “what were they thinking” scenes (such as one involving a 300-pound “elf” trying to put on a fat suit). The romantic/family comedy also demands a major suspension of disbelief in having the lovely Gabrielle Union portraying a woman (Nancy) who wishes a nice man would pay her a compliment.

Union plays the ex-wife of an obnoxious rapper, J. Jizzy (Charlie Murphy—Eddie’s older brother—who gets the most laughs in the film). The divorcee’s kid helps steer her to a handsome department-store Santa named Benjamin (Morris Chestnut) who also happens to be a songwriter. What’s more, he’s pitching his tunes to J. Jizzy. Much of the film involves Benjamin trying to keep Nancy and Jizzy from finding out about his romantic and business (respectively) arrangements with each of them. The problem is that there’s no logical reason why he should care—or lie to Nancy about his “true” vocation.

Much of the movie involves Nancy discussing life with her gals pals (Jill Marie Jones and Rachel True), Benjamin chumming around with his best bud, Jamal (Faizon Love); and J-Jizzy interacting with his spacey manager, Delicious (Katt Williams). This offers scenes of soul searching, self revelations and some strained comedy—but little of it is interesting.
There’s also little reason for Queen Latifah and Terrence Howard (who seems to have appeared in 95 percent of the films released in 2007) playing competing angels (or perhaps that’s angel vs. devil). Latifah breezes through her role, but Howard just seems embarrassed to be here (and who can blame him?).

One of the brightest parts of The Perfect Holiday is one of its most understated: a department store hires a black Santa and black elf helper, kids of all colors line up to visit Ol’ Saint Nick and no one questions it. It’s a sweet, hopeful set-up that offers a counterpoint to the otherwise pedestrian, plodding antics of The Perfect Holiday.
The Perfect Holiday is rated PG for brief language and some suggestive humor. Running time: 96 minutes. Macsimum rating: 4 out of 10. You can check out the film’s trailers on the QuickTime movie trailer site.

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